Can’t take a perfect picture of your dog in the snow? Think again!

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Hey you Instagram/social media users!

Yes you.. especially you dog lovers and owners!

We can all relate how hard it can be to take the perfect shot of your adorable fluff ball, especially in the snow right??

Well, it may not be as hard as you think…

All you need is something that your dog thrives for. It can be treats, toys, or even a snowball, whatever can catch your dogs attention and make them fully in tuned to you! I used a snowball since Sandy loves eating snow and thinks it’s a toy!

Ready for the big secret?? This can be done by using an iPhone! So don’t think that you have to bring your fancy camera out in the cold weather! With the right lighting and editing APP, you can make your photos look as if a professional photographer took them! I love using VOSCO editing app for my photos. Not only is it easy to navigate, it has so many effects and editing features. Just be aware that some effects may cost $1.00 but there are many you can get for FREE (which I use)!

Here are some tips that can help you when you are taking the photos. First, sprinkle some snow on your pup, if they don’t have any snow on them from playing or rolling around. My favorite places to sprinkle is the nose, back, chest, and head. I especially like to sprinkle some around their chest to give a framing effect of their body.

While I took the photos with one hand, in the other was my distraction hand. Once they know you have their possession, they will do anything for it. This makes you totally in charge! It makes it easy for us photographers because this gives us great opportunities to capture many shots from different angles. One technique I used was having Sandy sit, stand or just getting her full attention and then waving my distraction hand(the snowball) in all different directions; left, right, up, down. As I was waving my distraction hand, my camera hand continuously  captured photos from every angle. Remember, dogs have a short attention span.. Don’t tease your pup for too long or else they will get very impatient and try to lunge towards the toy. Wave it around for a good 5 or 10 seconds. This is the best way I believe to capture photos of your pup. They become completely in tuned to you!

Don’t be discouraged if your pictures didn’t turn out as you wished. You may have to do this for a bit of time, depending on what exactly you want to capture. My goal was to get a photo of her with snow perfectly on her nose with her puppy eyes twinkling.

In VOSCO editing app, I used a high exposure, low contrast, and a bit of shadowing to help me bring out the twinkle in her eyes.  I also used some saturation and a cool temperature(blue) to give the cool effect. In some pictures I gave a pink tint to give off a warm feeling to my viewers.

So enough of the “ughhh this is impossible” Because this mission impossible, became a mission possible!!!

Check out my Instagram for more!

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How to take a night landscape of city traffic!

Benjamin Franklin Bridge Pedestrian Walkway

Standing on Ben Franklin Bridge. Railing of Ben Franklin Bridge leading to a light. Philadelphia skyline to the left. On the bottom left corner are cars racing down a side street. There is a sunset with a pink blue and purple sky.
Photo 1
Night landscape of Schuylkill River. Two bridges in the distance. Railing is leading towards the Peco building in Philadelphia. 30th Street staion to the left of the river.
Photo 2
I95 highway of speeding cars in motion. Sunset with a dark blue sky on the top right corner. Bright lights of the city in the distance.
Photo 3

I am so happy that you took the time to watch my first tutorial! I really have enjoyed taking night portraits and landscapes. I have also been learning a whole lot of how to navigate the settings on my camera. For this specific photo in my tutorial, I used Aperture Priority Autoexposure (Av) exposure mode. This means that the user selects the f-stop (aperture setting) and the camera selects the shutter speed (the length of time a shutter is open to either freeze action or blur motion).

What I learned from last night was that I should have used the Shutter-Priority Autoexposure (Tv). This specific exposure mode allows the user to set the shutter speed and the camera selects the f-stop. Large aperture (f/1.4) has a fast shutter speed to freeze motion and is mainly used for focusing on a subject and blurring out any distractions around the subject. Large aperture is mainly used for portraits or closeups, like a picture of a flower or of a human. Small aperture (f/22) is a perfect for landscapes since it focuses on everything rather than a main subject. Small aperture also has a slow shutter speed which is great to use if you want to show motion like cars speeding on a highway (what I used).

If I used the Tv exposure mode, I think that I could have allowed more blurred motion of the cars passing by. There were a few complications though. First off there was very little traffic on I-95 which interfered with the length of my shutter speed. Instead of 15 seconds it should have been set for a minute. That could have been accomplished if the security guard wasn’t telling Chris and I that the foot walk was closed and that we had to get off.

One huge tip I advise is that you use a TRIPOD! One thing about using slow shutter speeds especially for night landscapes is that, slightest movement can ruin a picture causing it to become completely blurry. So I strongly suggest getting a Tripod if you want to take some sweet night shots! I have a Ravelli 50-inch that works very well, but is relatively short and was not taller than the railing. I would go for at least a 60-inch or 70-inch. You can get them on Amazon and are fairly cheap and work very well. I got mine for $14.00, the 60 and 70 inch are no higher than $30.

Lastly another tip for slow shutter speeds is to get a remote like I showed in my video. They are also fairly cheap ranging from $5 to $10 on Amazon. It works like a charm and all you have to do is, set your camera on continues/remote then press the S on your remote to open the shutter. This will allow you to capture the picture without pressing any button and causing movement that can potentially ruin your picture and make it blurry. The one I have is only for Canon, but you can find a remote for you camera by typing on Google.

What I hope you take away is that shutter speed, is mainly good for night landscapes. Especially for the kind of pictures I took. Make sure you have a tripod and remote to illuminate any movement since that can totally ruin your picture! Lastly set your exposure mode to Tv not Av! Even though I only spent 15 minutes on the Benjamin Franklin Bridge before being ask to leave, I had a really great time learning more about the settings and sharing how I take night landscapes.

I am still learning as well so if you have any additional comments I am definitely willing to hear!

Camera Settings

Photo 1

ISO: 100

Focal Length: 18mm

Exposure Compensation: -2 EV

Aperture: F/22

Shutter Speed: 30.0

Photo 2

ISO: 100

Focal Length: 18mm

Exposure Compensation: -2 EV

Aperture: f/22

Shutter Speed: 25.0

Photo 3

ISO: 100

Focal Length: 18mm

Exposure Compensation: -2 EV

Aperture: f/22

Shutter Speed: 15.0

Where to buy a remote for your camera:  http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=vello+ir+remote&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Avello+ir+remote

Where to buy a tripod for your camera:   http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=tripod&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Atripod

Some more info about setting on Canon’s:   http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/canon-eos-rebel-t3i600d-for-dummies.html